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cost of Culture & Sensitivity, Aerobic bacteria Stool  at Dr. Saoji Orthopaedic Clinic And Medilab Pathology Laboratory is 510.0

Culture & Sensitivity, Aerobic bacteria Stool

Dr. Saoji Orthopaedic Clinic And Medilab Pathology Laboratory
Sky Orthopaedics,1st Floor, Nikalas Tower, Central Bazar Road,Nagpur

4.3 / 5

₹ 510.0
Lab Details
Home sample collection available
Opening Ours MON-SAT 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM

cost of Culture & Sensitivity, Aerobic bacteria Stool  Dr. Saoji Orthopaedic Clinic And Medilab Pathology Laboratory at Ramdas Peth Nagpur

Know About Culture & Sensitivity, Aerobic bacteria Stool

The stool culture is a test that detects and identifies bacteria that cause infections of the lower digestive tract. The test distinguishes between the types of bacteria that cause disease (pathogenic) and the types that are normally found in the digestive tract (normal flora). The test helps to determine if pathogenic bacteria are the cause of a person's gastrointestinal symptoms (gastroenteritis).

The bacteria found in stool are representative of the bacteria that are present in the digestive system (gastrointestinal tract). Certain bacteria and fungi called normal flora inhabit everyone's gastrointestinal tract. They play an important role in the digestion of food and their presence keeps a check on the growth of disease-causing bacteria.

Sometimes, the balance of the normal flora may be affected by the administration of broad-spectrum antibiotics; the drugs inhibit the growth of normal flora and allow the bacteria Clostridium difficile that is resistant to the antibiotics to survive and overgrow the digestive tract, leading to symptoms such as diarrhea and abdominal pain.

Pathogenic bacteria can enter and infect the digestive tract when someone eats food or drinks water that is contaminated. Examples of contaminated sources include raw or undercooked eggs, poultry or beef, unpasteurized milk, and untreated water from lakes, streams, and (occasionally) from community water supplies. (For more on this, see the article Food and Waterborne Illness.)

People who travel outside the U.S., especially to developing nations, may face a greater risk of being exposed to disease-causing bacteria. Some of these bacteria may be true pathogens while others are strains of gastrointestinal bacteria that are normal flora for the local inhabitants but cause gastrointestinal distress to the tourist. Visitors may become infected by eating or drinking anything that has been contaminated with the bacteria, even things as simple as tap water, ice cubes in a drink, a fresh salad, or food from a vendor's stall.

The most common symptoms of a pathogenic bacterial infection are prolonged diarrhea, bloody diarrhea, mucus in the stool, abdominal pain and cramping, and nausea. If diarrhea lasts more than a few days, it may lead to complications such as dehydration and electrolyte imbalance, which can be dangerous conditions, especially for children and the elderly. Dehydration can cause symptoms such as dry skin, fatigue, and light-headedness.

Severely affected people may require hospitalization to replace lost fluids and electrolytes. Hemolytic uremic syndrome is a serious complication characterized by the destruction of red blood cells and kidney failure that may occasionally arise from an infection with a toxin-producing strain of the bacteria Escherichia coli. The condition is most frequently seen in children, the elderly, and those with weakened immune systems.

If a person's illness is uncomplicated and goes away within a few days, a healthcare practitioner may not order testing. However, if symptoms are severe, if there is bloody diarrhea or mucus present in the stool, or if it is continuing unabated, then a stool culture may be ordered. This is especially true if the person has been outside the U.S. and/or has eaten or drunk anything that has also made someone close to them ill.

To aid diagnosis, a stool culture may be done in conjunction with or following a GI pathogens panel that simultaneously tests for multiple disease-causing bacteria, viruses, and parasites. Other tests that may be done include an ova and parasite exam or antigen tests to identify specific microbes.

Bacterial Culture, stool; Feces Culture; Enteric Pathogens Culture, stool.

Infection in Digestive Tract; Digestive Tract;

To determine whether you have an infection of your digestive tract due to the presence of disease-causing (pathogenic) bacteria. When you have diarrhea, abdominal cramps, nausea and/or vomiting that is severe or lasts more than a few days.

A stool culture may be ordered when someone has signs and symptoms of an infection of the digestive tract, such as:

  • Diarrhea that lasts more than a few days and may contain blood and/or mucus
  • Abdominal pain and cramping
  • Nausea, vomiting
  • Fever

Not everyone who has these symptoms will necessarily have testing done or be treated. In people who have healthy immune systems, these infections often resolve with supportive care and without the use of antibiotics. A stool culture is more likely to be ordered when a person:

  • Has severe symptoms, dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, and/or other complications
  • Is very young, elderly, or has a weakened immune system; according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), diarrhea is a global killer. It is the second leading cause of death in children under the age of 5 worldwide, killing an estimated 2,195 children a day.
  • Has prolonged signs and symptoms and/or infections that do not resolve without treatment
  • Has eaten food or drunk fluids that may have been contaminated with pathogenic bacteria, such as undercooked meat or raw eggs, or the same food that has made others ill
  • Is ill and a possible foodborne or waterborne outbreak prompts the medical community to investigate and identify the cause; examples include contaminated produce, contaminated food from a specific restaurant, and/or illness on a cruise ship.

A healthcare practitioner may order one or more stool cultures when someone has had a previous pathogenic bacterial infection of the gastrointestinal tract and has either been treated for it or it has resolved on its own. This may be done to verify that the pathogenic bacteria are no longer detectable because in some cases people can become carriers of the bacteria. Carriers are not ill themselves, but they can infect other people.

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