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Blood cancer (leukemia, lymphoma , myeloma) : Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis and Treatment

What is Blood cancer?

As its name suggests, this type of cancer affects the production and function of your blood cells. This type of cancer starts in bone marrow which is the integral source of blood production. Stem cells in your bone marrow mature and develop into three types of blood cells: red blood cells, white blood cells, or platelets. In case of cancer, the blood production process is interrupted due to the growth of an abnormal type of blood cell. The various types include Leukemia, Lymphoma and Myeloma.

Blood cancer is also known as leukemia, lymphoma , myeloma. Blood cancer belongs under the category of Malignent, Benign disease. Multiple myeloma, Hodgkin lymphoma , Non-Hodgkin lymphoma and Leukemia are some common types of Blood cancer. Generally Male, Female, Child are the victim of the Blood cancer. Seriousness of this disease is Serious.

Symptoms of Blood cancer are :

  • Medium Fever
  • A fever is a higher-than-normal body temperature. It?s a sign of your body's natural fight against infection.

    • For adults, a fever is when your temperature is higher than 100.4°F.
    • For kids, a fever is when their temperature is higher than 100.4°F (measured rectally); 99.5°F (measured orally); or 99°F (measured under the arm).

    The average normal body temperature is 98.6° Fahrenheit (or 37° Celsius). When you or your child?s temperature rises a few degrees above normal, it?s a sign that the body is healthy and fighting infection. In most cases, that?s a good thing.

    But when a fever rises above 102°F it should be treated at home and, if necessary, by your healthcare provider if the fever doesn?t go down after a few days.

  • shaking chills
  • The shaking chills are sometimes referred to as rigors. They are kind of like shivering when you have an infection and fever, but much more intense. Teens usually get shaking chills from very bad infections, some drugs, and sometimes during blood transfusions. If you read the section on Fever, you will learn what causes your body to have a fever. Essentially, when your body senses a foreign substance ? germs, drugs, someone else?s blood ? it responds by increasing your body temperature, so it can fight off the perceived intruder. When your body temperature rises, the surface air feels cold and you begin to shiver. Sometimes the shivers are very intense and become shaking chills or rigors. One common anti-fungal medicine that often causes rigors is amphotericin (or sometimes referred to as ampho-terrible!). If this happens to you, your medical team may be able to switch you to a different type of amphotericin called liposomal amphotericin. You may also have the shaking chills when getting a blood transfusion. Even though the white blood cells (which often cause a reaction) have been filtered out of donated blood, a few remaining cells may cause you to have this reaction. Many teens describe this as one of the most frightening side effects of treatment. If you have this reaction, you will start feeling very cold. Soon, despite all efforts to get warm, you may begin shaking uncontrollably. The first time it happens you may think you are having some kind of seizure. Very scary! After a while, the chills and shaking will subside and you will feel very warm. Off come the blankets and heating pads and out come the cool washcloths! Read more about this in the Fever section.

  • Headaches along with visual difficulties
  • Abnormal bleeding in gums nose and cuts
  • Delirium and confusion
  • Bone pain and Back pain
  • abdominal pain
  • Abdominal pain has many potential causes. The most common causes ? such as gas pains, indigestion or a pulled muscle ? usually aren't serious. Other conditions may require more-urgent medical attention.

    While the location and pattern of abdominal pain can provide important clues, its time course is particularly useful when determining its cause.

    Acute abdominal pain develops, and often resolves, over a few hours to a few days. Chronic abdominal pain may be intermittent, or episodic, meaning it may come and go. This type of pain may be present for weeks to months, or even years. Some conditions cause progressive pain, which steadily gets worse over time.

  • Lymph node enlargement
  • Swollen lymph nodes usually occur as a result of infection from bacteria or viruses. Rarely, swollen lymph nodes are caused by cancer.

    Your lymph nodes, also called lymph glands, play a vital role in your body's ability to fight off infections. They function as filters, trapping viruses, bacteria and other causes of illnesses before they can infect other parts of your body. Common areas where you might notice swollen lymph nodes include your neck, under your chin, in your armpits and in your groin.

    In some cases, the passage of time and warm compresses may be all you need to treat swollen lymph nodes. If an infection causes swollen lymph nodes, treatment depends on the cause.

  • Weight loss
  • Sudden, noticeable weight loss can happen after a stressful event, although it can also be a sign of a serious illness.

    It's normal to lose a noticeable amount of weight after the stress of changing jobs, divorce, redundancy or bereavement.

    Weight often returns to normal when you start to feel happier, after you've had time to grieve or get used to the change. Counselling and support may be needed to help you get to this stage.

    Significant weight loss can also be the result of an eating disorder, such as anorexia or bulimia. If you think you have an eating disorder, talk to someone you trust and consider speaking to your GP. There are also several organisations that can provide you with information and advice, such as the eating disorders charity Beat.

    If your weight loss wasn't due to one of the causes mentioned, and you didn't lose weight through dieting or exercising, see your GP, as you may have an illness that needs treating.

  • Bleeding gums
  • Bleeding gums are the most common symptom of gum disease. But it can also point to other health problems.

    Occasional bleeding of the gums can be caused by brushing your teeth too vigorously or wearing dentures that don?t fit correctly. Frequent gum bleeding can also indicate more serious conditions, including:

    • periodontitis (an advanced form of gum disease)
    • leukemia (cancer of the blood)
    • vitamin deficiency
    • lack of clotting cells (platelets)
  • small chest pain
  • Angina is chest pain or discomfort caused when your heart muscle doesn't get enough oxygen-rich blood. It may feel like pressure or squeezing in your chest. The discomfort also can occur in your shoulders, arms, neck, jaw, or back. Angina pain may even feel like indigestion.

    But, angina is not a disease. It is a symptom of an underlying heart problem, usually coronary heart disease (CHD).There are many types of angina, including microvascular angina, Prinzmetal's angina, stable angina, unstable angina and variant angina. View an animation of angina(link opens in new window).

    This usually happens because one or more of the coronary arteries is narrowed or blocked, also called ischemia.

    Angina can also be a symptom of coronary microvascular disease (MVD). This is heart disease that affects the heart?s smallest coronary arteries and is more likely to affect women than men. Coronary MVD also is called cardiac syndrome X and non-obstructive CHD. Learn more about angina in women.

  • Night sweats
  • Night sweats are repeated episodes of extreme perspiration that may soak your nightclothes or bedding and are related to an underlying medical condition or illness.

    You may occasionally awaken after having perspired excessively, particularly if you are sleeping under too many blankets or if your bedroom is too warm. Although uncomfortable, these episodes are usually not labeled as night sweats and typically aren't a sign of a medical problem.

    In general, night sweats are also associated with fever, weight loss, localized pain, cough, diarrhea, or other symptoms of concern.

  • Skin rash
  • Itchy skin, also known as pruritus, is an irritating and uncontrollable sensation that makes you want to scratch to relieve the feeling. The possible causes for itchiness include internal illnesses and skin conditions.

    It?s important to see a doctor for itchiness if the cause isn?t obvious. A doctor can find the underlying cause and provide treatments for relief. Several home remedies such as over-the-counter creams and moisturizers work well for itching.

  • Swollen, painless lymph nodes in the neck, armpits, or groin
  • Swollen lymph nodes usually occur as a result of infection from bacteria or viruses. Rarely, swollen lymph nodes are caused by cancer.

    Your lymph nodes, also called lymph glands, play a vital role in your body's ability to fight off infections. They function as filters, trapping viruses, bacteria and other causes of illnesses before they can infect other parts of your body. Common areas where you might notice swollen lymph nodes include your neck, under your chin, in your armpits and in your groin.

    In some cases, the passage of time and warm compresses may be all you need to treat swollen lymph nodes. If an infection causes swollen lymph nodes, treatment depends on the cause.

  • Nausea
  • Nausea and vomiting are common signs and symptoms that can be caused by numerous conditions. Nausea and vomiting most often are due to viral gastroenteritis ? often mistakenly called stomach flu ? or the morning sickness of early pregnancy.

    Many medications can cause nausea and vomiting, as can general anesthesia for surgery. Rarely, nausea and vomiting may indicate a serious or even life-threatening problem.

  • Fatigue/weakness
  • Weakness

    Weakness is when strength is decreased and extra effort is needed to move a certain part of the body or the entire body. Weakness is due to loss of muscle strength. Weakness can be a big part of why cancer patients feel fatigue.

    Fatigue

    Fatigue is an extreme feeling of tiredness or lack of energy, often described as being exhausted. Fatigue is something that lasts even when a person seems to be getting enough sleep. It can have many causes, including working too much, having disturbed sleep, stress and worry, not having enough physical activity, and going through an illness and its treatment.

  • Difficulty in breathing
  • Experiencing breathing difficulty describes discomfort when breathing and feeling as if you can?t draw a complete breath. This can develop gradually or come on suddenly. Mild breathing problems, such as fatigue after an aerobics class, don?t fall into this category.

    Breathing difficulties can be caused by many different conditions. They can also develop as a result of stress and anxiety.

    It?s important to note that frequent episodes of shortness of breath or sudden, intense breathing difficulty may be signs of a serious health issue that needs medical attention. You should discuss any breathing concerns with your doctor.

  • Loss of appetite
  • Fatigue is a constant state of tiredness, even when you?ve gotten your usual amount of sleep. This symptom develops over time and causes a drop in your physical, emotional, and psychological energy levels. You?re also more likely to feel unmotivated to participate in or do activities you normally enjoy.

    Some other signs of fatigue include feeling:

    • physically weaker than usual
    • tired, despite rest
    • as though you have less stamina or endurance than normal
    • mentally tired and moody

    Loss of appetite means you don?t have the same desire to eat as you used to. Signs of decreased appetite include not wanting to eat, unintentional weight loss, and not feeling hungry. The idea of eating food may make you feel nauseous, as if you might vomit after eating. Long-term loss of appetite is also known as anorexia, which can have a medical or psychological cause.

    It may be a warning sign from your body when you feel fatigue and loss of appetite together. Read on to see what conditions may cause these symptoms.

  • Cough
  • When you?re sick or your lungs have become irritated, your body reacts by coughing. This is your body?s defense mechanism to clear out any mucus, allergens, or pollutants so that you don?t keep breathing it in. Coughing is usually nothing to be concerned about. When a cough is a symptom of a cold, it tends to clear up on its own within two or three weeks.

    A lingering cough or a chronic cough not brought on by a recent cold can be an indicator of a more serious condition. Coughs that last longer than eight weeksTrusted Source for adults, or four weeks in children, are considered chronic.

    Causes

    Blood cancer can be caused due to:

    • Aging.
    • Family history.
    • Weak immune system.
    • Certain infections

    What kind of precaution should be taken in Blood cancer?

    • Avoid Exposure to Radiations.
    • Avoid Exposure to Chemicals.
    • Avoid Smoking or Tobacco in Every Form.

    How it can be spread?

    • Blood circulation.

    Treatment for the Blood cancer

    • Biological therapy to kill cancers.
    • Chemotherapy.
    • Bone Marrow Transplantation.

    Possible complication with Blood cancer

    • Pain related to myeloma or myeloma treatment.
    • Osteonecrosis of the Jaw.
    • Kidney problem.
    • Impairment.
    • Myelosuppression.
    • Thrombosis and Embolism.
    • Hyperviscosity Syndrome.
    • Cryoglobulinemia|.

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