Please Enter Valid Name
{{inquiry.message.length}}/ 100
Please enter valid inquiry message
×

Runny nose

Overview of Runny nose

Something irritating or inflaming the nasal tissue of the nose is what causes it to become runny. To a stop a runny nose, a person will either need to stop what is irritating or inflaming their nose or take medications that will help reduce the inflammation and production of mucus.

A runny nose is the body?s way of getting rid of any germs that might be irritating or inflaming it. The nose produces clear mucus, which can turn yellow or green after a few days.

In medical literature, professionals call a runny nose rhinorrhea. A person may have a runny nose because they are allergic to something, due to a viral or bacterial infection, or as a result of of environmental factors such as temperature.

Home Remedies for Runny nose :

If you prefer using natural remedies, there are plenty of options that can help. Explore the following home treatments to see if any work for you and your runny nose.

1. Drink plenty of fluids

Drinking fluids and staying hydrated when dealing with a runny nose can be helpful if you also have symptoms of nasal congestion.

This ensures that mucus in your sinuses thins out to a runny consistency and is easy for you to expel. Otherwise, it may be thick and sticky, which congests the nose even further.

Avoid beverages that dehydrate rather than hydrate. This includes drinks like coffee and alcoholic beverages.

2. Hot teas

On the other hand, hot beverages like tea may sometimes be more helpful than cold ones. This is because of their heat and steam, which help open and decongest airways.

Certain herbal teas may contain herbs that are mild decongestants. Look for teas that contain anti-inflammatory and antihistamine herbs, such as chamomile, ginger, mint, or nettle.

Make a cup of hot herbal tea (preferably non-caffeinated) and inhale the steam before drinking. Sore throats often accompany runny noses ? drinking hot herbal tea can help soothe a sore throat, too.

3. Facial steam

Inhaling hot steam has been shown to help treat a runny nose. A 2015 study of people with the common cold proved that using steam inhalation was quite effective. It reduced illness recovery time by about one week compared to no steam inhalation at all.

In addition to inhaling steam from a hot cup of tea, try a facial steam. Here?s how:

  1. Heat clean water in a clean pot on your stove. Heat it just enough so that steam is created ?DON?T let it get to a boil.
  2. Place your face above the steam for 20 to 30 minutes at a time. Take deep breaths through your nose. Take breaks if your face gets too hot.
  3. Blow your nose afterward to get rid of mucus.

If desired, add a few drops of decongestant essential oils to your facial steam water. About two drops per ounce of water is sufficient.

Eucalyptus, peppermint, pine, rosemary, sage, spearmint, tea tree (melaleuca), and thyme oils are great options. Compounds in these plants (like menthol and thymol) are also found in many over-the-counter decongestants.

If you don?t have these essential oils, use these herbs in dried form instead. Make your facial steam into an herbal tea and inhale the vapors ? you?ll get the same benefits.

4. Hot shower

Need some quick relief? Try a hot shower. Just like a hot tea or facial steam, a shower?s spray can help alleviate a runny and stuffy nose.

Place your face and sinuses directly in the steam and spray of the shower for best results.

5. Neti pot

Using a neti pot for nasal irrigation (also called nasal lavage) is a common approach to sinus issues. This includes runny nose problems and discomfort.

Neti pots are small teapot-like containers with a spout. You add a warm saline or saltwater solution to the pot. You then use the pot to pour the solution through one nostril and out the other. This rinses out your sinuses quite thoroughly.

Purchase a neti pot kit at your local pharmacy, store, or online. Make sure to follow directions for your neti pot exactly. Improper use of neti pots can, though rarely

6. Eating spicy foods

Spicy foods can make a runny nose worse. However, if you?re also having symptoms of nasal congestion, eating spicy foods can possibly help.

If you can tolerate quite a bit of heat in your food, give it a try. If you?re unaccustomed to spiciness, try a little bit of spicy seasonings at first to see if it helps.

Hot spices like cayenne pepper, ghost pepper, habanero, wasabi, horseradish, or ginger are great options. These spices, while also creating a feeling of heat when eaten, dilate passageways in the body and can relieve sinus issues.

7. Capsaicin

Capsaicin is the chemical that makes chili peppers spicy. It?s been used to treat nerve pain and psoriasis, but if you apply it on your nose, it can help with a runny nose caused by congestion.

Several studies have found that capsaicin is more effective at treating runny noses than the over-the-counter medication budesonide.

When to see doctor for Runny nose :

A runny nose is typically not a medical emergency. However, it can be a symptom of certain chronic or acute conditions, such as a sinus infection or rhinitis.

If a runny nose does not begin to improve after a few days, it may be a good idea to consult a doctor, especially if the person is also experiencing flu-like symptoms.

Treatment for the Runny nose

Decongestants can curb swelling inside your nose and sinuses, and help you breathe more easily.

There are two types:

  • Pills or syrups. If you see the letter "D" at the end of a medicine's name, it means it includes a decongestant. Look for products with phenylephrine or pseudoephedrine. (You may have to ask for these. They're still considered over-the-counter but are often stored behind the counter.)
  • Nasal sprays. Products with oxymetazoline and phenylephrine may work faster than pills or syrups. But if you use them for more than 2-3 days in a row, your congestion could get worse.

Don't take both types of decongestant at the same time. Start with a nasal spray for the first couple of days, and switch to a pill or syrup if you still need it.

Share:

Health Condition Related to Runny nose